Do I need to take a different CBD dosage depending on my condition?

Perfect dosage for anxiety, pain and bad sleep

One of the most commonly asked questions about CBD is how much should you be taking. This can depend on a variety of factors which are specific to your body and what condition you are tending to. But before we go into this, let’s look at how CBD dosage is measured.

The measurement used for CBD is mg per serving size, or per product. As a wide variety of products exists to help different people with various conditions, it is important to pay attention to how many mg CBD in your chosen product. This information should always be readily available on the label.

Products that are of individual serving size, such as capsules or gummies, will have dosages measured out by the manufacturers. The advantage of this is you know exactly how much you are taking each and every time, no guesstimation involved. Meanwhile. CBD oils come with an estimated amount in each drop or serving size - but this cannot be as precise. However, this does mean that you can alter your dosage more freely by adding a couple of drops, instead of doubling it as the case would be with gummies or capsules.

A person’s optimal dosage is calculated via multiple elements. As we know, no two people are the same, inside or out. You will need to take into consideration factors such as: weight, metabolism and the acuteness of your condition. For new users, the recommended starting dosage is 15/20mg, which is generally the serving size in products such as CBD capsules. Note down how much, how often, and the effects you are feeling - this way you will be able to pinpoint your personal optimum.

The condition you are trying to treat will also play a role in the dosage. Let’s take a look at some of the researched and analysed CBD doses for various conditions:

Anxiety

Finding a way to treat anxiety naturally is a big goal for many people, and CBD is a very popular answer. In the UK alone, approximately 200,000 people are self-medicating with CBD for anxiety. In 2011, a human study was carried out which showed potential for using CBD with social anxiety disorder.1 This study gave the participant a single 600mg dosage. However, this is far higher than the usual dosage. It is believed that (depending on weight and metabolism) to reduce symptoms of anxiety, 40-80mg daily is recommended.

Sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep is like gold dust. We would do anything to ensure an uninterrupted 8 hours of shut-eye. On top of this, approximately 1.5 million people in the UK suffer from a sleep disorder. CBD can promote homeostasis, as well as promote relaxation and reduce pain which are all vital factors to getting a better night’s sleep. In higher doses CBD can act as a mild sedative, up to 80mg is recommended 30 minutes before sleep.

Pain

CBD has the ability to act like chemical painkillers (such as paracetamol), naturally. This means avoiding potential side effects that painkillers can have. A study from 2012 shows how cannabinoids interact with the endocannabinoid system which suppresses the inflammatory response and reduces pain.2 As there are so many varying levels of pain, there are currently no clear cut guidelines for CBD and pain. It is recommended to take the same dose times a day, for example 30mg x 3, at regular intervals. If you’re suffering from muscular pain try out a CBD topical skin cream.

Taking an overdose of CBD on a one-time occaission will not leave you with any severe side effects. It is likely that you will feel drowsy and fatigued, but as there are no psychoactive elements your health or safety is not at risk. Studies have found that humans receiving repeatedly high dosages (1500mg) of CBD tolerated it well.3

If you are currently taking any prescribed medication or have any medical concerns, please speak to your doctor before taking CBD. High quality CBD products from trusted manufacturers should be forthright when it comes to the potency and doses of their CBD products, making your experience as a customer as simple as possible.

1 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4604171/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3371734/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22129319

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17 January 2020